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Pee4Pizza

It’s important to get tested at least once a year if you are sexually active. Making STI tests part of your routine healthcare is a great way to stay healthy. It should be normal as going to the dentist!

Pee4Pizza is a free, confidential STI testing day on campus that has been run with Hamilton Public Health, and campaign to inform students about STI testing. Click on the headings below to learn more about what happens during different types of STI tests, what they test for, and how often you should get tested.

Expandable List

It tests for:

  • Chalmydia (bacteria) in your genitals
  • Gonorrhea (bacteria) in your genitals

It doesn’t test for:

  • Chlamydia in your throat/butt
  • Gonorrhea in your throat/butt
  • Heptatitis A, B, or C
  • Genital warts/HPV
  • Trichomoniasis
  • Syphilis
  • Herpes
  • Hiv

Why this test?

Genital chlamydia and gonorrhea are the most common STIs in this age group and in the City of Hamilton.

What happens?

  1. A healthcare provider will give you a small plastic container
  2. You take the container into the bathroom and pee into it to the indicated line
  3. You return the container to the healthcare provider
  4. The container is sent to the lab for testing

What happens after?

  • You’ll receive a call from Public Health if you test positive and a nurse will let you know your options for in-person treatment
  • If you haven’t received a call and would like to know your test results, you can call Public Health

Blood test

What happens?

  • A healthcare provider will use a needle to take a vial of blood from your arm
  • The vial is sent to the lab for testing

What does it test for?

  • HIV (virus)
  • Syphilis (virus)
  • Heptatis A, B, and C (virus)

Rapid HIV Testing

What happens?

  • A healthcare provider will prick your finger and take a few drops of blood
  • In minutes, a non-reactive or reactive result will appear
  • If reactive, a vial of blood will be drawn from your arm and sent to the lab for further testing

What does it test for?

  • HIV (virus)

Swabs

What happens?

  • A healthcare provider will use a long swab to take a sample of fluid from your vagina, throat, butt, or open sore, or penis if you have discharge
  • It’s becoming more popular for a healthcare provider to give you a swab to bring into the bathroom so you can take a sample yourself
  • The sample is sent to the lab for testing

What does it test for?

  • Chalmydia (bacteria)
  • Gonorrhea (bacteria)
  • Herpes (virus), if open sore is present
  • Trichomoniasis (parasite)

Visual Exam

What happens?

  • A healthcare provider will take a look at the affected area on your body

What does it test for?

  • Genital warts/HPV (virus)
  • Herpes (virus)

When should I get tested?

Get tested at least once a year if you are sexually active. Making STI tests part of your routine healthcare is a great way to stay healthy. It should be as normal as going to the dentist!

Beyond a yearly test, it’s a good idea to get tested if:

  • You have a new sexual partner
  • You notice bumps, discharge, or rashes

Most people who have STIs are asymptomatic, so if you’re sexually active, don’t wait until you see symptoms to get tested.

When will results show?

It takes time for STIs to show up positive on a test. This amount of time is often called the window period. The window period for each STI is different:

  • HIV: 12 weeks
  • Chlamydia: 24-72 hours
  • Gonorrhea: 24-72 hours
  • Hepatitis A: 1-4 weeks
  • Heptatis B: 2 weeks-9 months
  • Hepatitis C: 12 weeks
  • Syphilis: 4-6 weeks
  • Herpes: testing must be done within 72 hours of a sore opening

Where can I get tested?

Student Wellness Centre: open Monday-Friday year-round, call 905-525-9140 ext. 27700 or visit MUSC B101 to book an appointment. Your visits to the SWC are never linked to your student record, no matter what you visit for.

Hamilton Sexual Health Clinics: different locations around the city that offer different clinic days each week.

The AIDS Network: monthly Men4Men clinic for men who have sex with men.

Get tested. Get treated. Get talking.